Thorn and Bloom: All About Growing Roses

Thorn and Bloom: All About Growing Roses

Let’s get this straight: roses are a symbol for love for most excellent reasons. 

They are difficult, they are cruel, and they will cut you.

And yet, the sight and fragrance of a rose bouquet can be on of the most ephemeral transcendent experiences of beauty the natural world can gift to us. Nothing else smells like a fragrant garden rose, and perhaps no other flower offers such a variety of color and shape.  

Fruit Thinning: AKA, how to kill the many to benefit the precious delicious few

Fruit Thinning: AKA, how to kill the many to benefit the precious delicious few

There are a bunch of solid reasons to thin your fruit, depending on the kind of fruit tree. I will break it down by species a bit more below, but in general, orchardists thin fruit for the following reasons:

  1. to discourage overbearing and thereby improve the size and flavor of the remaining fruits

  2. to prevent rot forming and insects from nesting in between fruits that grow together

  3. to prevent limbs from breaking from too much fruit load

  4. to stimulate next years crop and prevent biennial fruiting

The Eating of Persimmons

The Eating of Persimmons

When I was a child growing up in Indiana, every year I looked forward to an amazing seasonal treat called persimmon pudding. It was more of a bread than a pudding, similar to banana bread with a thick moist texture, packed with spices, and often topped with homemade whipped cream. I loved that desert fiendishly, though I had no idea what a persimmon was. As an adult, I moved to California, and began to encounter the persimmons here in tree form, with their perfect orange globes hanging like perfect ornaments from bare trees in the late Fall.  Only then did I connect the treat of my childhood with the iconic fruit trees growing in my new home.

Giving Thanks - November 22, 2018

It’s been quite a year. After 5 years on this property, planting trees and building a farm in the slowest of possible ways, we finally had a real harvest, and it was a great one! It’s hard to believe that the thin and spindly twigs of bare-root trees that are delivered in the dead of winter, then gently placed into the ground, will someday grow into healthy trees covered in fruit. And yet, so it is, and of the 600 or so trees we have planted, most are now thriving, and perhaps half fruited this year, most for the first time.  I am so grateful to everyone who believed in our crazy mission to grow a diverse fruit orchard on these bare acres 62 months ago.